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Scottish Terrier

Scottish Terrier PictureScottish Terrier Picture
Breed Information
Popularity 2016: #582015: #582014: #59
Name Scottish Terrier
Other names Scottie, Aberdeenie
Origin United Kingdom
Breed Group Terrier (AKC:1885)(UKC)
Size Small
Type Purebred
Life span 11-13 years
Temperament IndependentFeistyAlertPlayfulQuickSelf-assured
Height 10-11 inches (25-28 cm)
Weight 19-23 pounds (8.5-10.5 kg)
Colors BlackBlack BrindleBrindleRed BrindleSilver BrindleWheaten
Litter Size 2-5 puppies
Puppy Price Average $800 - $1000 USD
Breed Characteristics
Adaptability 3 stars
Apartment Friendly 5 starsThis dog is good for apartment living. It is moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Prefers cool climates.
Barking Tendencies 1 starsRare
Cat Friendly 3 stars
Child Friendly 4 starsGood with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
Dog Friendly 2 stars
Exercise Needs 3 starsThese are active little dogs that need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.
Grooming 3 starsModerate Maintenance: The Scottie’s sculptured appearance requires some work in the form of regular brushing and clipping, so much so that the Scottish Terrier Club of America publishes an illustrated grooming guide. The heavy-duty manual has laminated pages in a three-ring binder and contains grooming instructions for puppies, pets, and show dogs.
Health Issues 4 starsHypoallergenic: Yes
Intelligence 4 starsRanking: #65. (See All Rankings)
Playfulness 3 stars
Shedding Level 1 starsMinimal Shedding: This dog will shed a negligible amount. Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with dog hair in their cars and homes.
Stranger Friendly 3 stars
Trainability 3 starsModerately Easy Training: If training is consistent, it should be relatively easy. A Scottie's independence should always be respected in the training process.
Watchdog Ability 3 stars
Scottish Terrier Puppy PictureScottish Terrier Puppy Picture
Puppy Names
Rank Male Female
01 Charlie Lucy
02 Max Bella
03 Rocky Sadie
04 Jake Shelby
05 Riley Lola
06 Duke Molly
07 Toby Lulu
08 Milo Dixie
09 Oscar Phoebe
10 Tucker Kona
See All Names ›
Overview

The Scottish terrier is a short-legged, compact, relatively heavy-boned dog, giving the impression of great power in a small package. This combination is essential in a dog that must meet tough adversaries in tight spaces. Its coat is a combination of dense undercoat and extremely hardy and wiry outer coat, about 2 inches in length. The distinctive eyebrows and beard add to its expression, which is keen and sharp.

Nicknamed the Diehard in reference to its rugged character, the Scottish terrier is a tough, determined character, ready for action. It is fearless and feisty and may be aggressive toward other dogs and animals. It is reserved, but friendly, with strangers, and devoted to its family. Although independent and stubborn, it is sensitive. It tends to dig and bark.

History
The Scottish Terrier originated in the highlands of Scotland. Although references to small, scrappy “earth” dogs appeared in several of the earliest books on dogs, there are few written records of early breed history. Scotties remained isolated by geography until the late 1870s, when Captain W. W. Mackie toured the highlands, buying Scottish Terriers and writing about them. Predators such as foxes, badgers, rats and other vermin competed with local hunters for scarce game. Scotties were bred to go underground and flush or kill any such creature that went to ground. At first, the breed was surrounded by controversy, with each proponent certain that he alone had the correct breed type. There was even controversy about the breed’s correct name. They were sometimes referred to as Aberdeen Terriers, Cairn Terriers, and Skye Terriers, but as their popularity grew, “Scottish Terrier” was the name that stuck. By the turn of the century, Scotties were appearing in show rings on both sides of the Atlantic. During the 1930s, Scotties were wildly popular. President Franklin Roosevelt’s Fala was the most well-known dog of his era. Today, the majority of Scotties are family companions, but the breed’s feisty character and instinct to dig and hunt are still intact.