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Irish Setter

Irish Setter PictureIrish Setter Picture
Breed Information
Popularity 2016: #762015: #722014: #73
Name Irish Setter
Other names Red Setter, Irish Red Setter
Origin Ireland
Breed Group Sporting (AKC:1878)Gundog (UKC)
Size Large
Type Purebred
Life span 12-14 years
Temperament AffectionateCompanionableEnergeticIndependentLivelyPlayfulIntelligent
Height Male: 26-28 inches (66-71 cm)Female: 24-26 inches (61-66 cm)
Weight Male: 65-75 pounds (29-34 kg)Female: 55-65 pounds (25-29 kg)
Colors Mahogany
Litter Size 7-10 puppies
Puppy Price Average $800 - $1000 USD
Breed Characteristics
Adaptability 5 stars
Apartment Friendly 1 starsThe Irish Setter is not recommended for apartment life unless the owners are active daily joggers or bikers and plan on taking the dog along with them. This breed does best with a large yard.
Barking Tendencies 1 starsRare
Cat Friendly 5 stars
Child Friendly 5 starsGood with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
Dog Friendly 5 stars
Exercise Needs 5 starsAll setters need a daily long, brisk walk or jog or they will become restless and difficult to manage. In addition, they will also enjoy running free in the safety of a fenced yard.
Grooming 4 starsModerate Maintenance: The coat needs brushing and combing two or three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. A bath every two to four weeks or so doesn’t go amiss. Tips on grooming and the best tools to use are available from this Irish Setter breeder.
Health Issues 3 starsHypoallergenic: No
Intelligence 4 starsRanking: #35. (See All Rankings)
Playfulness 5 stars
Shedding Level 3 starsModerate Shedding: Expect this dog to shed regularly. Be prepared to vacuum often. Brushing will reduce shedding as well as make the coat softer and cleaner.
Stranger Friendly 5 stars
Trainability 3 starsModerately Easy Training: Irish Setters take to training well. Handlers must be consistent in approach. It may be necessary to take the dog to a puppy training course. Young Irish Setters need to be trained when young to return when you call them.
Watchdog Ability 3 stars
Irish Setter Puppy PictureIrish Setter Puppy Picture
Puppy Names
Rank Male Female
01 Buddy Bella
02 Cooper Daisy
03 Jack Lola
04 Harley Maggie
05 Duke Emma
06 Toby Chloe
07 Sammy Roxy
08 Teddy Bailey
09 Cody Nala
10 Gizmo Layla
See All Names ›
Overview

Among the most breathtaking of dogs, the Irish setter's beauty is in part the result of necessity. Its elegant, yet substantial build enables it to hunt with speed and stamina. Its build is slightly longer than tall, giving ample room for movement without interference between fore and hind legs. The trot is ground-covering and efficient. The coat is flat, straight and of moderate length, with longer feathering on ears, backs of legs, belly, chest and tail, providing protection from briars without becoming entangled in them. The rich mahogany color is just beautiful.

The Irish setter was bred to be a tireless and enthusiastic hunter, and it approaches everything in life with a rollicking, good-natured attitude, full of gusto and fervor. Given a daily outlet for its energy, it makes a pleasant companion. Without ample exercise, it can be overly active inside or become frustrated. It is an amiable breed, eager to please and be part of its family's activities. It is good with children, but can be too rambunctious for small children. It is less popular as a hunter than the other setters.

History
The Irish Setter is a working gun dog that was developed in Ireland. The breed was probably developed by using a combination of spaniels, other setters, pointers and the Irish Terrier. At first, Irish Setters were in the same family with the Irish Red and White Setter, but they were separated into an individual breed in the early 1800’s. Over a period of time the breed was split between field and show dogs, but today an effort is being made to bring the field ability and the beauty of the Irish Setter together. Over the years many breeders have started breeding more for looks rather than the dog’s hunting ability. The Irish Setter's talents include hunting, tracking, retrieving, pointing, watchdog, agility and competitive obedience.
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