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Coton De Tulear

Coton De Tulear PictureCoton De Tulear Picture
Breed Information
Popularity 2016: #802015: #852014: #31
Name Coton De Tulear
Other names Coton, Cotie
Origin Madagascar
Breed Group Non Sporting (AKC:2014)Companion (UKC)
Size Small
Type Purebred
Life span 14-16 years
Temperament AffectionateIntelligentLivelyPlayfulTrainableVocal
Height 10-12 inches (25-30 cm)
Weight 12-15 pounds (5.5-7 kg)
Colors White
Litter Size 4-6 puppies
Puppy Price Average $1000 - $1200 USD
Breed Characteristics
Adaptability 5 stars
Apartment Friendly 5 starsThe Coton is good for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.
Barking Tendencies 3 starsOccassional
Cat Friendly 5 stars
Child Friendly 4 starsGood with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
Dog Friendly 4 stars
Exercise Needs 3 starsCotons like to swim and play. They enjoy wide open spaces and can follow their masters on horseback for many miles. They do well in various areas of dog sports, such as agility skills trials and catch. As active as they are, they will adapt well to the family's situation, so long as they are taken for a daily walk.
Grooming 5 starsHigh Maintenance: The Coton de Tulear’s unique coat requires a substantial time investment. It must be brushed thoroughly each day and bathed several times a year. It should not be clipped.
Health Issues 3 starsHypoallergenic: Yes
Intelligence 3 starsRanking: (#). (See All Rankings)
Playfulness 4 stars
Shedding Level 2 starsLike poodles, they do not "shed", meaning they don't drop hair on furniture, carpeting, etc. They do lose hair; the texture of their coat causes the shed hair to be trapped in the coat. If not brushed and combed daily, the fur of this breed will mat up quickly and may require shaving.
Stranger Friendly 4 stars
Trainability 5 starsEasy Training: The Coton de Tulear is intelligent, making it a quick learner, but it can be a bit stubborn. It thrives on its master’s approval, so a praise-based approach, rather than punishment, should be employed.
Watchdog Ability 3 stars
Coton De Tulear Puppy PictureCoton De Tulear Puppy Picture
Puppy Names
Rank Male Female
01 Max Lucy
02 Cooper Bella
03 Charlie Molly
04 Oliver Lola
05 Jake Chloe
06 Cody Ellie
07 Milo Stella
08 Riley Annie
09 Sam Coco
10 Louie Nala
See All Names ›
Overview

“Coton” is the French word for cotton. Like the name suggests, the most conspicuous feature of the Coton de Tulear is its coat, which is cottony or fluffy rather than silky. It has a long topcoat. The fluffy hair covers the thin, lightly-muscled forelegs. Colors come in white and black, and white and tri-colored. (White is preferred by show breeders.) Some have slightly yellowish markings on the ears.

Cotons are happy dogs that thrive on human companionship. Puppy kindergarten and obedience training are recommended. They should not be left unattended for long periods of time. They are extremely sturdy and versatile, excelling in all types of dog activities, from agility to therapy. The breed gets along well with other dogs, cats and children provided that proper socialization is given.

History
The Coton de Tulear originates from the island of Madagascar, off the coast of Africa in the Indian Ocean. The breed derives its name from the French word coton, meaning "cotton," and from the Madagascan port of Tulear. Tulear was once a popular port of merchant ships sailing the Indian Ocean, and it is believed that around the 15th or 16th century, European merchants introduced various Bichon-type companion dogs to Madagascar. It is probable that the breed evolved from the interbreeding of those Bichon strains. It is presumed that because of their beauty and affectionate personality, these dogs were offered to the King and Malagasy nobles. In the 17th century, the Coton de Tulear was adopted by the ruling "Merina" tribal monarchy, and it was forbidden that anyone other than royalty own the breed. Thus became the breed's prevalent title of "Royal Dog of Madagascar." The Coton de Tulear was officially recognized by the AKC in 2014.